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Cheap DIY Projects to Add Value to Your Home

Selling in the Spring? Add Value to Your Home

Are you thinking about selling your home this upcoming Spring? Make use of the indoor Winter months by making DIY improvements. These affordable updates will not only make it easier to sell when it’s time, but they will also add value to your home. And who knows, this process may leave you falling back in love with your home all over again!

We always say our blog offers “tips, tricks, and tips that you can actually use,” and here is great example. After a lot of research, we determined that most lists include expensive suggestions most of us cannot afford. While for some folks hiring experts is feasible, we have compiled a few DIY updates you can do yourself for cheap, or even free, that will add value to your home.

Fresh Paint

If this seems like the most obvious, it is. New home buyers judge the value of your home based on its appearance, so it’s important to show you’ve taken care of it. Fresh coats of paint are a great place to start.

Plan your rooms by color scheme or style, and try not to get overwhelmed. If you tackle this project one room at a time, you may find it easiest. This is because you’ll need to clear the room of anything touching the walls, and depending on your space and storage, this could pose the biggest challenge. If your biggest challenge is deciding what paint color to choose, check out our blog here on How to Choose Paint Colors for Your Home.

 

Let there be Light

We cannot state enough how important light is in your home! Both the amount of light that enters in through windows, and the actual lights you have up inside your home itself.

Replace outdated fixtures with modern fixtures, add in floor lamps in dark rooms, and make sure all your lightbulbs are working before scheduling showings. Check out our wide selection of American Freight lamps and lighting accessories here, and check out this blog with some of our favorite lamps and accessories that will help you add value to your home.

Ditch Outdated Styles

This is by no mean’s a judgment-thing, because at one time, all outdated styles were popular. But when selling your home, buyers look for modern and updated details. Common dated looks buyers hate include: linoleum floors, shag carpeting, peach walls, avocado green appliances, wood paneling on the walls, ceramic tile counter-tops, and popcorn ceilings, which we’ll talk about next in detail.

When updating, a good rule of thumb is: when in doubt, go classic & neutral. Blacks, whites, browns, greys, tans, and creams last forever. If you know you’re moving out, try to let go of putting your own touch on your stylings. Instead, focus on adding value to your home for someone else to enjoy. Remember: it can be all about first appearances for buyers!

Spruce up your Ceilings

Popcorn ceilings used to be all the rage. Also known as stucco or cottage ceilings, many homes built in the late 1930s through the 1990s have popcorn ceilings or some type of texture applied to the ceilings. The good news if this applies to your home? It’s a cheap fix, but just takes time.

Here are three ways you can go about dealing with a popcorn ceiling in detail according to This Old House. They break down the steps for scraping, covering with drywall, or skim coating a new design.

Plan to Plant

A nice yard yells the house! Use the library or internet research to study up on landscaping. Of course, you can’t dig and plant during the cold months, and need softer soil and better climate. Make a plan to plant trees & low maintenance landscaping come Springtime.

Think of shrubs, annual flowers, and evergreens/deciduous trees whose leaves don’t typically fall each season. As they say, “work smarter, not harder.” Why add a bunch of trees that create more work for you?

 

 

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Kelley is a professional copywriter and content strategist at American Freight Furniture and Mattress. In other words, she does words.